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K' Road Stories (with a Pot Luck bonus!)


I was excited when I heard about K'Road Stories. I love the road these short films are set in, Karangahape Road in central Auckland, where I once spent a lot of time.

I was even more excited when I saw that – funded by New Zealand On Air  – HALF of K'Road Stories have women writers/directors. This year's best Australasian example of gender equity in state screen funding?

This is what the website says–
K' Rd Stories cracks open the surface of life on Karangahape Road, revealing diverse cultures and unique voices. 
Set on New Zealand’s most iconic street this collection of short films - by some of New Zealand’s most creative filmmakers - explores the uncommon, the contrasting, and the crazy. 
The films premiered along an innovative screening trail on Karangahape Road in conjunction with First Thursdays on December 3rd, 2015. K Rd Stories sneaks a peek at the people and places that make this neighbourhood so infamous – and so beloved.

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The women-written-and- directed K'Road Stories, for holiday viewing! When you're waiting about or lying about or wishing you were here in Aotearoa New Zealand's summer. Or thinking about films that women make and hoping we'll make more of them in 2016.
Alphabetically by title–
Aroha wr/dir Nikki Si'ulepa
Closed wr/dir Petra Cibilich
Fritters wr/dir Karyn Childs
Put Your Hands Together wr/dir Jane Sherning Warren
Sugar Hit wr/dir Roseanne Liang












And here's a bonus. All these women have other work you can track down. But only Nikki Si'ulepa  is also one of the stars of New Zealand's first lesbian webseries, Pot Luck, written and directed by Ness Simons. Set in Wellington! First episode just out and more funded via Boosted.

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Here's that first episode–




And finally, for all of us who crowd fund, this lovely graph(ic) that Pot Luck produced–


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