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A Glimpse of The Future, With Inspiring Stories

Sehar, Michelle & Inspiring Stories' Guy Ryan
I love Inspiring Stories and its Making a Difference film competition.

Making a Difference challenges aspiring Kiwi filmmakers to tell the story of a young person who’s doing something extraordinary.  It embraces difference of many kinds. (2016 entries open NOW!)

Inspiring Stories on Facebook & on Twitter

This year's Making a Difference winners have just been announced and just look! It's obvious that the competition engages young women and they do well. A lesson for competitions-in-general and for film organisations, as is that other young people's competition, The Outlook For Someday(Their results coming soon!)

Warm congratulations to all the winners. The future's here, right now. And it's looking good!

Overall Winner and Most Inspiring Story
Best Cinematography Award
Making A Difference Award
Sehar’s Story
Michelle Vergel de Dios (Auckland)

Social Justice Award
Open Category Award
Youth Pride, Youth Passion, Youth Change
Nina Griffiths (Northland)

Creativity & Culture Award (Awarded with backing from The Big Idea)
Environment/Kaitiaki Award (Awarded with backing from Sustainable Coastlines)
Whenua Finds a Future
Sarah Risdale (Palmerston North)

Leadership Award (Awarded with backing from the Sir Peter Blake Trust)
Best Editing Award
Secondary Schools Category Award
Rewind
Liam van Eeden and Jean-Martin Fabre (Invercargill)

Best Editing Award – Honorable Mentions
Strands of Hope, Amy Huang
Mountains for Malawi, Henry Donald

Tertiary Institution Category Award
Aspire
Samantha Smyrke (Otago/Rotorua)


Here's Sehar's Story, by Michelle Vergel de Dios.

 

And Nina Grifffiths' Youth Pride, Youth Passion, Youth Change



And Sarah Risdale's Whenua Finds a Future




And Samatha Smyrke's Aspire






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