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NZFC Gender Policy docs 2017


Earlier this year, WIFTNZ submitted a proposal to the New Zealand Film Commission (NZFC), the organisation that distributes taxpayer funding to the film industry. The NZFC rejected the proposal and decided to consult more widely.

I have permission to publish all the documents below - warm thanks to WIFTNZ and the NZFC - and I'm researching and writing about the issues they raise.

If you're affected by the NZFC policy and haven't been involved in the debate I hope you'll will be inspired to have your say, to your guilds and in the media. And if you've already contributed to the debate and haven't yet seen these documents I hope you'll read and reflect on them and say or write or do more.

The documents are in date order. By now, there's probably more correspondence with the guilds.

'Patricia' is WIFTNZ's National Manager.



'Dale' is the NZFC's Talent Development Manager.


&, as his letter to WIFT says, Dave Gibson is the NZFC's CEO, until early next year.












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