Skip to main content

#cannes17: Still Too Few Women Directors!

Cannes doesn’t change much! Just three films by women out of the 18 films In Competition when Cannes opens on 17 May. (The record, in 2011, is four.) Here they are–

Joaquin Phoenix and Lynne Ramsay (photo): The Playlist
Lynne Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here, about a damaged war veteran, played by Joaquin Phoenix, who rescues women involved in sex trafficking.

Naomi Kawase’s Hikari (Radiance).




And Sophia Coppola's The Beguiled.




And Visages, Villages, co-directed by Agnès Varda and JR has been selected Out of Competition.


It’s a little better in Un Certain Regard, five out of sixteen–

La Novia del Desierto, the debut of Cecilia Atan and Valeria Pivato, two Argentinian women.

Aala Kaf Ifrit (La Belle et la Meute), by the Tunisian Kaouther Ben Hania.




Western, by Valeska Grisebach (produced by Maren Ade).

Jeune Femme, first film by Léonor Séraille from France.

Après la Guerre by Annarita Zambrano from Italy.


AND there are three women-directed Special Screenings

Vanessa Redgrave’s doco about refugees, Sea Sorrow.



It’s the first film Vanessa Redgrave has directed and is ‘a meditative reflection on the current refugee-migrant crisis mixing past and present, documentary and drama, framed within the ongoing struggle for human rights’.

They, directed by Anahita Ghazvinizadeh, whose Needle premiered in the Cannes Cinéfondation selection and won the Premier Prix, a few years back, will have a special screening too. All I can find about They is here, about its development as a Not-Coming-of-Age drama about J who has been diagnosed with Gender Identity Disorder, with this gorgeous drawing.




Finally, An Inconvenient Sequel, directed by Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk will also have a special screening.

And then there are the 70th Anniversary Events–

Jane Campion’s and Ariel Kleiman's Top of the Lake: China Girl is one.




And Kirsten Stewart's short Come Swim.

AND NB! According to Women & Hollywood, as has happened before, women directors are comparatively well-represented in the Cannes short film selection — women direct 33% of shorts selected in competition this year and 44% of Cinéfondation films by film school students.

16 May

And here's W&H's infographic, so useful!



SaveSaveSaveSave

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Safety in Paradise?

Children play in safety on the beach beyond my window. Some aren't safe at home, but they do not die in rocket attacks. Along our promenade, this year’s most sustained sirens wailed from motorbike cavalcades, as they escorted royalty to and from the airport. At school, our children may arrive hungry. But they're safe from abduction. The closest I’ve ever been to a war is my parents' silence about 'their' war, refuge women's stories about men returned from wars and Bruce Cunningham’s stories, after I met him selling Anzac poppies. (He was a Lancaster pilot in World War II and then a prisoner-of-war and I’m making a short doco about him.)

Yes, in many ways Wellington, New Zealand is paradise and I’m blessed to live here and to benefit from love and generosity from women and men, my beautiful sons now among those men. But in an interview with Matthew Hammett Knott earlier this year, I found myself saying–
We have to deal with serial violation, direct and subtle, on…

Women Directors of Feature Films in New Zealand

Last week, two lovely people questioned me about my work. I don't look back at it often, but returned to my PhD thesis and various statistics-oriented posts I'd almost forgotten, like this one and this one. And then remembered a survey that I wrote for Geoff Lealand, the New Zealand editor of the second edition of the Directory of World Cinema: Australia and New Zealand. When I looked at it again, I realised that even in the year since I wrote it lots has changed. (I think you can also tell that I don't enjoy writing 'academic', am much happier in real-time immediate responses). 

So here it is while some of it's still relevant and to accompany Matthew Hammett Knott's interview with me, for his Heroines of Cinema series (blush). 

If I were writing a survey today, I'd include all the short films New Zealand actresses write and direct and theirpotential as multihyphenates. I'd include Marama Killen's self-funded feature, Kaikahu Road. I'd add mor…

NZ Update #3: WIFT New Zealand

This is Part 3 of an NZ Update 4-part series. Part 1 was Gender Breakthrough in New Zealand Film Commission Funding. Part 2 was a letter to Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Women, Paula Bennett, about the New Zealand Screen Production Grant. Part 4 is a not-quite-A-Z of New Zealand women directors and some writers.

So how has Women in Film & Television New Zealand (WIFTNZ) responded to the lack of gender parity between women and men who write and direct, in particular the lack of gender parity in allocation of taxpayer funding? For example, does it endorse Telefilm Canada's statement, referred to back in Part 1 and to some extent implicit in the New Zealand Film Commission (NZFC)'s latest Annual Report?–
Based on industry recommendations that these two roles require immediate critical attention, gender parity amongst directors and screenwriters was identified as a priority (emphasis added).The simple answer: No-one Knows For Sure. And because of this, I believe it'…