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We Do It Together

Marianne Slot, Chiara Tilesi, Patricia Riggen and Juliette Binoche speak at Cannes
We Do It Together is a globally oriented non-profit production company, founded by Italian producer Chiara Tilesi. It's a wonderfully ambitious concept. According to its website We Do It Together aims–
...to use the power of cinema, and all those who join us, to stir and shake human hearts and minds, to balance these numbers and change deep-seated perceptions about female stereotypes. As a first practical step, we feel that the way to make this a reality is to give women from around the world a concrete way to express themselves, their talent, and tell their stories.

We will choose a diverse group of female directors to join us in making films that will challenge and dismantle these perceptions. We feel that good intentions are not enough, and that when given the chance, women will deliver compelling, accessible, and equally commercial stories, and break down these invisible walls in doing so. Outworn stereotypes will give way when we defy the status quo. We have been joined by producers, writers, agents, managers, University Presidents, renowned professors, actresses, actors, directors, from Hollywood, and from around the world.
It has just announced its first project at Cannes, where it also presented one of the Women in Motion panels. The project, Together Now, seven short films in one, each pairing a woman director with a prominent actress. The directors who have signed on include Robin Wright, Catherine Hardwicke, Katia Lund (All the Invisible Children), Patricia Riggen (The 33), Haifaa al Mansour (Wadjda), Malgorzata Szumowska (Elles) and Melina Matsoukas (Beyonce's Formation). Freida Pinto and Juliette Binoche are among the actors attached.


Cannes: Freida Pinto next to Juliette Binoche, among others in the group
I was a little surprised that the first project is an omnibus film, but it follows the model that Chiara Tilesi chose for her first feature, All the Invisible Children, produced for the United Nations’ agencies UNICEF, and World Food Programme (and directed mostly by men: Spike Lee, Ridley and Jordan Scott, Emir Kusturica, John Woo, Stefano Veneruso, Katia Lund, Mehdi Charef.) From Chiara's recent speech to the United Nations (see below), it looks as though We Do It Together aims to build on the relationships she's built there.

Let's hope We Do It Together becomes a truly global organisation with a wide diversity of projects. I'm admiring their caps with my fingers crossed!



We Do It Together's Advisory Board includes–

Alysia Reiner, Amma Asante, Avy Kaufman, Catherine Hardwick, Frieda Pinto, Haifaa Al Mansour, Hany Abu-Assad, Hylda Queally, Jessica Chasten, Jodie Foster, Juliette Binoche, Katia Lund, Len Amato, Małgorzata Szumowska, Marianne Slot, Marielle Heller, Michelle Satter, Nina L. Shaw, Phil Lord, Queen Latifah, Robin Wright, Stacey Sher, Valeria Golino, Ziyi Zhang and more!






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