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Make My Movie: Women's Horrors To Vote For

I didn't analyse the Make My Movie entries this year, to check out how many women participated. But four out of twelve finalists are written by women and a fifth is written jointly by a woman and a man. Warm congratulations to all these finalists, listed alphabetically by project. You can vote for a project by clicking on the link provided.

Please do vote for the projects you like the look of, because the prize is a $200,000 cash grant from the New Zealand Film Commission and Darksky Films/MPI Pictures – if you vote, we could have a new feature from a woman quite soon!




The Card Game
Written By Kathryn Akuhata-Brown

A stranger joins a small town poker game and sets about winning everything from the players until they have nothing left to gamble but their children.

Kathryn Akuhata-Brown Film





Collision
Written By Maile Daugherty

At 2am, on a pitch-black country road, a car is involved in a violent full-speed head-on collision. As ambulance, police and fire fighters work to free and save the couple in the car, it becomes clear that this is no regular accident. Soon the emergency workers themselves become victims of something hidden in the darkness, and the lives they must save are their own.

An Antipodean Films Film





Mother’s Little Boy
Written By Thomas Sainsbury & Kirstin Marcon
When the mischievous, sickly Phillip Black finally hits puberty his mother becomes increasingly deranged, resorting to bizarre and terrifying methods to keep her little Phillip from ever growing up.

Particle Magazine Productions Film





Mother’s Milk
Written By Beatrice Hunter, Kacie Stetson

An archaeologist investigating a mysterious group of missionary graves finds that a sinister history could be repeating itself. As her crew begin to succumb to vile illness and delirium she must fight a determined force to save her own body from a gruesome colonization.

A Beatrice Hunter, Kacie Stetson Film





Strangers Have The Best Candy
Written By Naomi Rowley

Forced to stay home for the spookiest night of the year, Halloween, Natalie finds herself on the receiving end of countless social media updates on her friend’s night out. But when the images start to turn gruesome, Natalie must figure a way to find them before the uploads cease … but should she?

A Naomi Rowley Film




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Related post
Make My Movie last year here (scroll down).

Comments

  1. Watching someone else go through something in movies similar to what we have experienced in our own life can give us clues as to how you can handle it in a different manner.

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