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Gender & Academy Awards Foreign Language Submissions

A record 76 countries submitted films to the Academy Awards Foreign Language category. Attached to these films are 79 directors, 17 of them women. That's 21.5%, which I believe is at the higher end of the proportion of feature films directed by women, globally. The three women in this list who are joint directors all share that credit with men. (WHY are there so rarely women who co-direct?).Any guesses about which of these will be among the few actually nominated? Or might win? I suspect that in this context Haifaa al-Mansour's Wadjda will be up there. I've seen so few of these films though. There's a fine opportunity for an enterprising person to set up an online festival (hello Indiereign, hello MUBI) , so we can all share the delights of the very diverse directors' achievements!

Images of the directors are on my Pinterest board, Oscars 2014 Women Directors. Hoping this board will flourish over the next few months--

Here's the list:


Argentina - Wakolda, directed by Lucía Puenzo (Spanish, German)



Canada - Gabrielle, directed by Louise Archambault (French)



Czech Republic - Burning Bush, directed by Agnieszka Holland (Czech)



Finland - Disciple, directed by Ulrika Bengts (Finnish)



Georgia - In Bloom, directed by Nana Ekvtimishvili and Simon Groß



Lebanon - Blind Intersections, directed by Lara Saba



Lithuania - Conversations on Serious Topics, directed by Giedrė Beinoriūtė



There's a longer trailer on Youtube, here, which I cannot embed.

New Zealand - White Lies, directed by Dana Rotberg (Maori)



Norway - I Am Yours, directed by Iram Haq (Norwegian, Urdu)



Pakistan - Zinda Bhaag, directed by Meenu Gaur and Farjad Nabi (Udu, Punjabi)



Philippines - Transit, directed by Hannah Espia (Filipino, Tagalog, Hebrew)



Portugal - Lines of Wellington, directed by Valeria Sarmiento



Saudi Arabia - Wadjda, directed by Haifaa al-Mansour (Arabic)



Slovakia - My Dog Killer, directed by Mira Fornay (Slovak)



Spain - 15 Years and One Day, directed by Gracia Querejeta (Spanish)



Sweden - Eat Sleep Die, directed by Gabriela Pichler (Swedish, Croatian)

The only trailer I can find is on MUBI, where we can also watch it.

Ukraine - Paradjanov, directed by Serge Avedikian and Olena Fetisova (Russian)



Many thanks for the list, to Peter Knegt at Indiewire.

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