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You CANNES Not Be Serious!



Well, that was quick---  FilmDirecting4Women have set up a petition. You can sign it nowalongside women like Kay Armatage and venerable filmmaker Su Friedrich, and enjoy the comments (my favorite so far is Agata Nowakowska's "Pfff, this is ridiculous!") AND you can join the Facebook site and follow the tweets. You can also follow Melissa Silverstein’s tweets and her blog posts at Women & Hollywood.
And you can buy a protest Tshirt. All profits from t-shirts sales go to Film Directing 4 Women's soon-to- be-launched production fund which will back short films directed by women directors.
And here's another blog post about the issue. And another tweet, referring to a Telegraph article (with a closeup of radiant Kathryn Bigelow with her Oscar): "@CampbellX Should women really bother making films anymore? Unless of course they are testosterone soaked? #feminism #cannes". (I've noticed that #cannes10 Twitter conversations are a little different than #cannes conversations and am thinking of trying my first French language tweet---)


And, if you're on Facebook, there's also Beyond Borders: Diversity in Cannes. Beyond Borders seeks to strengthen the cross cultural network of the various ethnic groups represented at Cannes.


And---- And---- And----

I read the other day that 'our' Gaylene Preston will be in Cannes, with her stunning Home by Christmas, which I like best of all her films (see sidebar for details). I hope she gets a warm welcome, buyers from around the world, and has lots of fun. I see Home by Christmas as New Zealand's powerful, subtle, intimate, companion to The Hurt Locker, and with huge potential for cellphone viewing as well as on the big screen. I've seen it twice—once for structure and the second time for the emotion—and expect to watch it again, with pleasure.

Comments

  1. If there's anything I've learned from having filmmaker friends and seeing films made (off and on) over the years, it's that a filmmaker has to be her most ardent advocate of not only her film, but herself as a filmmaker!

    In a world that's so rapidly changing in terms of technology for transmitting, moving media (film, TV), maybe this is where women will lead the way, in a sense in a similar way to how so many women were screenwriters and directors in early Hollywood (where did they go??? and why???)

    Two steps forward and one step back, that's how it always seems with filmmaking when you're talking about women's stories on screen. What will it take to reach parity? It's not just about numbers or percentages, though, it's about a global raising of consciousness to the point where this issue, some day (some day, some day...) will no longer be so relevant that we have to fight tooth and nail for our work to be seen and heard. It will be a given that women's screen stories will be seen and heard and enjoyed and consumed and shared in the way that men's work is today.

    I dream of the day I (or my descendants) can even DARE to take for granted the fact that women-made films are successful (and common & KNOWN!) and women filmmakers' names are household words.

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