Driving a truck?

Women script writers don't often write about their working lives for publication: one reason I went back to re-read Virginia Woolf about women writers. 

But men do. 

David Mamet's Bambi vs Godzilla  entertained me and gave me a title for my thesis: Living with deferred hope: Autoethnography and New Zealand women's participation in script writing for feature films. ("Dramatic structure consists of the creation and deferment of hope... The reversals, the surprises, and the ultimate conclusion of the hero's quest... in direct proportion to the plausibility of  the opponent forces.")

And Joe Eszterhas' The Devil's Guide to Hollywood; The Screenwriter as God! gave me a helpful slogan, among his advice about laptops, and masturbation, and writing six pages of script a day, in a chapter called "Slit a vein and drip it on the page!" (He seems to like exclamation marks, and ...  though one teacher told me that scriptwriters don't use them: Use -- she advised.)  

Joe Eszterhas heads one piece of advice "If you don't feel like writing today..." 

And on the next line: "Comedian Rita Rudner: 'People don't want to get up and drive a truck every day either, but they do—that's their job and this is my job'." 

I have stuck a sign above my desk, for when my mind's wandering and I'm tempted to escape: I AM A TRUCK DRIVER. 

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