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NZ Update #6: Short Films by NZ Women at the #NZIFF

Here, in alphabetical order by director, are the New Zealand women-directed short films selected for three sections of the New Zealand International Film Festival. Because a successful short film is seen as an element of the pipeline to taxpayer funding for a feature film, selection of these films really matters.

Some of these come from this year’s New Zealand’s Best Short Film competition (BSF), where half of those elected are #DirectedByWomen. NZIFF programmers Bill Gosden and Michael McDonnell made a shortlist of 12 films from 83 submissions and veteran filmmaker Gaylene Preston selected six finalists. And the winners of the associated awards do well! A jury of three will select the winner of the $5,000 Madman Entertainment Jury Prize, and the Wallace Foundation and Wallace Media Ltd will award a $3,000 Wallace Friends of the Civic Award to the film or contributor to a film they deem to merit special recognition. The winner of the audience vote takes away the Audience Choice Award, consisting of 25 percent of the box office from the main-centre NZIFF screenings.

Others come from latest and best Māori and Pasifika short films (MP), selected by Leo Koziol, Director of the Wairoa Māori Film Festival, and Craig Fasi, Director of the Pollywood Film Festival; four out of six selected are #DirectedByWomen. Wouldn't it be wonderful if this group's listings included cast-and-crew details; and competed for a group of awards, too?

Some Shorts with Features (SwF) are part of a third group, where three out of twelve films are #DirectedByWomen. It'd be good to have more details for these, too. Where I can, I've provided some additional information.

Fingers crossed, the women who directed these will make features before too long. Let's seek out their work and cherish them.

Waiting 2016 (BSF, 12 minutes)

Two boys wait outside a dairy for a phone call.


Director Amberley Jo Aumua
Screenplay Samuel Kamu
Photography Greer Lindsay
Editor Huhana Ruri-Panapa

With Desmond Malakai, Casta-Troy Cocker-Lemailie

Laundry 2017 (BSF, 11 minutes)

A frustrated mum struggles to find intimacy while raising a young family.


Director/Screenplay Becs Arahanga
Producers Julian Arahanga, Kath Akuhuata-Brown
Photography Chris Mauger
Editor Luke Evans

With Aidee Walker, Jarod Rawiri

Untitled Groping Revenge Fairytale 2017 (BSF, 9 minutes)

A woman pitches a tent on the edge of a forest and starts to collect men.


Director/Screenplay Catherine Bisley
Producer William Bisley
Photography/Editor Paul Wedel

With Loren Taylor

Sunday Fun Day 2016 (MP, 15 minutes)

A teenager and a solo mum prepare to have their own fun on a Sunday.


Director/Screenplay Dianna Fuemana
Producer Jay Ryan

Tree 2017 (MP, 16 minutes)

A young woman with a shameful secret hides out from friends and family in a massive tree.


Director/Screenplay Lauren Jackson
Producers Andrew Cochrane, Jeremy Macey

Lauren Jackson's multi-award-winning I'm Going to Mum's was a finalist for Best Short Film in 2013, selected by Alison Maclean.


Each to Their Own (SwF, 19 minutes)

A grieving girl is drawn in by a charismatic church.


Director Maria Ines Manchego
Producer Lani-Rain Feltham

Festivals
Locarno

Natalie 2016 (MP, 9 minutes)

A Māori girl receives a precious waiata composed by her deceased grandfather.



Director/ Screenplay Qianna Titore
Producer Eloise Veber

Qianna is the youngest-ever writer/director to have a film in the NZIFF. Lovely Māori television interview with her here.


Have You Tried, Maybe, Not Worrying? 2017 (SwF, 15 minutes)

A young woman's battle with an anxiety disorder, over a 48 hour period.

 actors Jordan Vaha'akolo & Florence Noble
Director/ Screenplay Rachel Ross
Producer Hamish Mortland

Mannahatta 2017 (MP, 15 minutes)

An ancient spirit tries to send a message to a recent immigrant in the city that never sleeps.


Director/Producer/Screenplay Renae Maihi

Renae is also one of the eight directors of WARU, a feature film selected for the festival.

Festivals
ImagineNATIVE

Do No Harm 2017 (BSF, 12 minutes)

A doctor abides by her Hippocratic oath even when violent gangsters interrupt her surgery. 


Director/Screenplay Roseanne Liang
Producer Hamish Mortland
Photography Andrew McGeorge
Editor Tom Eagles

With Marsha Yuan, Jacob Tomuri

Festivals
Sundance
Etheria Film Night (Audience Award)
SXSW


The World in Your Window 2016 (SwF, 15 minutes)

Eight year old Jesse lives in a twilight world of sadness and silence, squeezed into a tiny caravan with his grief stricken father: looking forward is harder than looking back.

Couldn't resist the poster
Director Zoe McIntosh Screenplay Costa Botes,  Zoe Macintosh
Producer Hamish Mortland

Festivals
Tribeca
Clermont Ferrand (Prix Etudiant de la Jeunesse)
Busan International Film Festival




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