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NZer Jackie van Beek wins First Prize in WIFTI Short-Case!

Members from Women in Film chapters all over the world submitted over 800 films for Women in Film International's 10th anniversary Showcase, now called Short-Case, and for the first time ever, WIFTI awarded cash prizes to the top three winning films. What a thrill that New Zealand's Jackie Van Beek won First Prize. Here's the info about all the winners and their films, from WIFTI, with some additions about Jackie's work. And if you're interested in short films by women, you can check out all the finalists here.

First Prize Uphill
Desperate to be alone, May escapes to a tiny hut in the mountains, but her peace is destroyed when another couple turns up for the night.

Director: Jackie van Beek


Jackie's  an actor, writer and director who works in both theatre and film. Her six short films have played in festivals that include the Berlin Film Festival, London Film Festival and the Melbourne International Film Festival. They've picked up a number of awards in Australasia and are used as educational resources in Australia, France, Denmark and the UK.

Jackie won Best Actor at New Zealand's Show Me Shorts festival, for her portrayal of May in Uphill and Ari Wegner was nominated for the Best Cinematographer award.

Jackie won Best Supporting Actress in the 2014 New Zealand Film Awards for her role in the vampire mockumentary, What We Do In the Shadows and was also awarded the SPADA New Filmmaker of the Year in 2013. She's currently in pre-production – or production! – with her first feature, The Inland Road, with a Facebook page here.

WIFT New Zealand

Second Prize FaimHunger
In a grim not-so-distant dystopia, all food distribution is rigidly controlled. Table scraps are monitored to guard against waste. Despite tomorrow's compulsory medical check-up, worker Jean-Paul rebels by secretly cooking forbidden food. His friend Nathan arrives to enjoy the delicious dinner. The next day, they may bear the consequences, but Jean-Paul will relish the memory.

Director: Matilde Rousseau


Mathilde Rousseau is a scriptwriter-woman director. She is also working in the television industry. Currently, she is working on several short film projects. Faim is her first short film.

FCTV Paris (France)


Third Prize Mbeti: The Road to Kisesini
In Kenya and other African countries, many newborns die within the first year of life - usually from infection or other preventable causes. This compelling documentary is designed to engage a diverse international audience with a powerful visual narrative.

Director: Ann Bromberg



A native New Mexican, Ann Bromberg has worked on both television and film projects since 1990.

New Mexico WIF


Best from an Emerging Chapter (Asia, Africa, Latin America, Middle East) Keli
Animated tale of a young girl dealing with the issue of self-determination. Ponnu is fascinated by Pottan Theyyam, an ancient rebel who stood for equality. She dreams to be like him, dance like him, but she is realising how hard it is for 'her' to be like 'him.'

Director: Ranjitha Rajeevan

Ranjitha is a prolific Animator/ Filmmaker from Ahmedabad, India. Keli is her post graduation film from the National Institute of Design.

WIFT India

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