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MIA

lisa gornick intense drawing face 
I'm working on a novella. Up early, 45 minutes on the egg timer, breakfast, another two lots of 45 minutes. And then a bit of gardening, as I think about where and how to go next with the story. A VERY quiet life, because I've never written a novella, and want to see how it differs from a feature screenplay, which has about the same number of words.

And was interrupted by the Wellington NZFC review meeting, and the Fresh Shorts announcement, and rounding up statistics for a wee report about NZFC gender inequity, available here, but without a couple of graphs; I can't load them onto the Development FB notes or onto this blog, but they're included in my PhD thesis.* So far responses to the report are very positive, and I am hopeful (as always) that things may change for New Zealand women filmmakers.

And then have to complete some work for which I was paid before I started my PhD (embarrassing, yes, even though there was also a significant element that was unpaid for), and the new draft of Development-the-movie (plus its one-pager which mates helped me with a while back). And to find some new paid work (all offers welcome!) And to start the Activate course at Grow Wellington (can't wait!), to hone the business model Erica and I have created, for testing with Development. If the model works well, and we believe it will, we'll then offer it to other women who would like to use it, within the charitable trust that Russell McVeagh is generously establishing for Spiral. And Meredith and I are working on a simpler Development website, so that's in flux too. 

Anyway, all this means that I'm not writing much here, just adding interesting stuff on the Development FB site, as it comes in. And I look a bit like Lisa Gornick in the drawing above. Focused. Alert. But not here.

And since it's the end of the year, and I love boots, here's Lisa's boot pic, too, just for fun & pleasure. Many thanks, dear Lisa. Hope you're staying warm.

And many thanks to all of you readers, whether in the Ukraine, Uganda, United States or United Kingdom, down the hill in Courtenay Place, along the road in Oriental Bay, or somewhere else entirely. I love knowing you're there and you're here. And really really love it when you talk to me.


lisa gornick new boots for the cold


* The link says it's a Management thesis, but in fact it's a Creative Writing PhD. There's a long back-story about a library embargo on the thesis, because of the Development script in it, as Chapter 6; the script is not available in the download. Many thanks to Deborah Jones, my original supervisor, for helping to make the rest of the thesis available in the interim, and for ensuring I did a lot of reading I might otherwise have avoided.

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