Skip to main content

& that's it from Wellywood this week--

Well, nearly it. Just one more deadline to meet, before 11.15pm. But having a little rest, and seeing a link to Joni Mitchell (yep! still checking out those Girls Like Us) I found this clip. Spot on at the end of this Hobbit-filled week, with enough conflicts and characters and secrets and revelations for fifteen movies. In the end, what's a girl to believe? Especially if she's read Lorraine Rowlands' thesis, and learned a little more about what working in the industry costs New Zealand film workers (and the health and social welfare systems)--

You might enjoy Joni too. If you've got a drink in hand, are pottering about between #FF tweethearting & FB. If you're a bit lost because Russell Brown finally closed the Public Address Hobbit party in the very early hours of this morning (Islander still in fine fettle). If you've caught up with Gordon Campbell's analysis. If you're a mite confused about it all, remembering especially those John Campbell interviews with Peter Jackson & Philippa Boyens and then with Robyn Malcolm & Tandi Wright. And if Linda Burgess' review of those interviews in the Dompost entertained you and you're disappointed that the review hasn't appeared online at Stuff. Or Ian Mune entertained you. Or Maia's feminist view intrigued you & made you think about some of the power issues. Or you've read Paul Roth's take and feel sad, & placed it alongside the LA Times view of us, and smiled. And if you're happy to be kinda lulled; & after all that raruraru and thinking, to experience the pleasure of a song-sung-from-the-heart.

Thanks, Joni. Not just #FF. #F_FOREVER.

Comments

  1. And here's a wee followup (late December 2010): http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/political/64636/govt-was-pushed-to-change-law-for-hobbit-films

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

After the Waterfall—

above: Antony Starr as John

After The Waterfallis the only New Zealand feature in the New Zealand International Film Festival that a woman—Simone Horrocks—has written and directed. It premiered in Beijing earlier this month, as part of the 5th New Zealand Film Festival in the People’s Republic of China. Here's Simone speaking at the premiere.


Simone first attracted international attention when she was a semi-finalist for the prestigious Sundance Institute/NHK Filmmaker's Award in 2001. She has written and directed several short films, notably Spindrift, winner of the Best Panorama Short Film award at the Berlin Film Festival, and New Dawn, commissioned by the Edinburgh Film Festival to mark the launch of UK Film Four's Lab. I knew almost nothing about her. So I peppered her with emailed questions. And was truly delighted with her generous responses.

Dana Rotberg and White Lies|Tuakiri Huna

Cushla Parekowhai and I went to previews for Dana Rotberg's new feature White Lies/Tuakiri Huna – Cush in Auckland and me down here in Wellington. And the film excited us. White Lies/Tuakiri Huna, described as 'a story about the nature of identity: those who deny it and those who strive to protect it', comes from Medicine Woman, a novella by Witi Ihimaera, who also wrote Whale Rider. (Witi is Cushla's cousin. Witi's father, Tom Smiler, and Cush's grandmother, Pani Turangi, were raised in the same household in Manutuke.)

Dana wrote, in the book that accompanies the film, that after she read Medicine Woman –
...Paraiti, the medicine woman, was a stubborn presence who refused to leave. I felt that was a clear sign that the story...was speaking to me from places other than where the original work had come from. Places that belonged to my intimate family history and my most unresolved conflicts as a person in the world. It was a call from the core of my origins to l…

NZ Update #17.1 Safety Revisited

(This is easier to read over on Medium)

Back in October, just before the #directedbywomen screenings in Auckland, I tumbled down a steep flight of wooden steps in Auckland's Ayr Street Reserve. Cracked one ankle and broke the fibula in my other leg. Missed spring gardening. Missed all of Wanuri Kahiu's visit (but not some beautiful responses from the many people she inspired and revitalised).

Couldn't transcribe or edit my #directedbywomen Skype interview with Isabel Coixet. Couldn't edit and publish other almost-ready interviews I cherished. Couldn't organise more screenings that filmmakers had requested, with the films' directors beamed in to Te Auaha's small treasure of a cinema for Q & As, also via Skype.

After two months almost entirely at home, half-way down a pedestrian-access steep zigzag, I'm fully mobile again. With thanks to the Accident Compensation Corporation's (ACC, our universal no-fault accidental injury scheme) fine services; to…